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College of Veterinary Medicine

Protein that culls damaged eggs identified, infertility reversed

Protein that culls damaged eggs identified, infertility reversed

A new discovery by Cornell researchers may lead to therapies that allow women who are made infertile by radiation or chemotherapy treatments to have children. More: http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2014/01/protein-discovery-may-lead-infertility-treatment

 

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About the College

Cornell’s program in veterinary medicine is the oldest in the United States, having granted the nation’s first doctor of veterinary medicine degree to Daniel E. Salmon, who went on to discover Salmonella, and the first American college to grant a veterinary degree to a woman, Florence Kimball. Today, Cornell is the number one ranked veterinary college in the United States, reflecting the unique breadth and depth of the College, which includes an innovative problem-based teaching program; leading-edge hospitals, including a world-class teaching hospital in Ithaca, NY, and the country’s largest university-affiliated emergency and specialty referral veterinary practice in Stamford, CT; world-renowned animal disease research, outreach, and surveillance programs, including the Animal Health Diagnostic Center, Baker Institute for Animal Health, and the Feline Health Center; and internationally recognized biomedical research laboratories.

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Our Vision

Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine aspires to be a global leader in animal health. With teaching, research, and service programs that improve the quality of life for animals and people across the country and on multiple continents, the College is focused on enhancing its position as the top-ranked veterinary college in biomedical discovery.

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Our Strategic Plan

Our Strategic Plan

The Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine takes pride in its rich tradition as an innovator in veterinary education, animal disease discovery, clinical programs, and biomedical research. To continue to prepare leaders who will positively shape the profession of veterinary medicine and thus maintain a leadership position, it must creatively address the significant challenges facing academic veterinary medicine. Under the direction of Dean Michael Kotlikoff, faculty, alumni, and members of the veterinary community engaged in a comprehensive strategic planning effort to develop strategic goals and enabling strategies for each of the College’s four mission areas – education, clinical service, research, and diagnostics.

 

Read the College’s strategic plan

Campaign Priorities -- An Overview

The College’s consistent number one ranking and its strength as a leader in veterinary medical education, animal medicine, biomedical research and public health springs from the combined strengths of its program and the people behind them. Their work has a profound impact on the health and well-being of animal and human health every day and a tremendous impact on the direction the profession of veterinary medicine takes. To maintain its position of influence and continue preparing highly trained veterinarians capable of anticipating and responding to some of society's most challenging issues, the College has identified five priority areas:

Faculty Renewal
Professional Student Scholarships/Fellowships/Residencies
Service Learning and Engagement
Life Sciences Research
Library Collections
Annual Fund Support

Faculty Renewal

World-renowned, the College’s faculty members have all played a pivotal role in advancing the veterinary profession, through discovery, education, patient care, and community service. With many of these influential leaders planning for retirement, the College must recruit a new generation of equally talented paradigm-shifters who will continue to address some of society’s most pressing veterinary and human health issues at a time when faculty retirements at institutions across the country are at all-time highs. Support for faculty – endowed and through the Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellows program – will help us prepare for these impending retirements.

Professional Student Scholarships, Fellowships, Residencies

Access to Cornell’s highly specialized veterinary education program is in jeopardy for two reasons:

  • The debt to salary ratio for new graduates is an impediment.
  • When compared to the other top-ranked veterinary colleges, Cornell has the fewest seats for veterinary candidates and they are the hardest to get.

 

These challenges are influencing who is able to enter the profession and the number of people qualified to care for the health and well-being of animals and people. With your help, we can remove these barriers to the profession through endowed scholarships that will support tomorrow’s veterinarians, endowed residencies for those who want to pursue specialty medicine, and graduate fellowships that will enable promising scientists who are working side-by-side leading researchers.

Service Learning and Engagement

Through service-learning opportunities, Cornell students build clinical competencies by providing direct care to animals and develop a deeper understanding of serving those less fortunate. These structured and supervised hands-on training opportunities empower students to speak for those who can’t and to serve those who might not otherwise have access to appropriate medical care. To meet our goals, we invite you to partner with us to strengthen our equipment, supply and travel funds for students in service-learning opportunities like the Cornell-Shelter Outreach Services collaborative teaching program. In addition, we seek support to secure the future of the Southside Healthy Pet Clinic, Maddies’® Shelter Medicine Program, and Expanding Horizons.

Life Sciences Research

The College is a leader in medical research, spanning basic biomedical discoveries, high impact clinical innovations, and environmental and epidemiological studies. Many of the College’s research programs involve cross-Cornell collaborations, and College faculty members continue to play key roles in strategic and innovative initiatives that target the treatment of disease. With a focus on Infectious Disease Control, Comparative Genomics, Comparative Reproductive Medicine, and Cancer Research, discoveries made at the College impact all species. Endowments for life sciences research to advance the prevention and treatment of disease in all species will ensure that we continue to advance the health and well-being of animals and people.

Library Collections

Cornell’s world-class veterinary school is committed to preparing tomorrow's veterinarians to be leaders in the “one-health” concept — the idea that veterinary medicine and human medicine are inextricably linked — which means that the Library's resources must support this long-standing interrelationship. Toward that goal, the Flower-Sprecher Veterinary Library has identified the purchase of more ebooks and ejournals in human medicine as its top priority.These acquisitions will also support faculty research. Other areas that need support include:

  • Public health and global medicine teaching and research
  • Emerging subject areas, including drug discovery
  • Business management and pet health marketing studies
  • Rare and historical books in veterinary medicine

Annual Fund

Annual Fund dollars are put to use as soon as they are given, providing the dean with the flexibility to address needs as they arise, as well as anticipated priorities of the College. Annual Fund gifts help equip the labs of bright new faculty choosing to teach at Cornell; they fund new initiatives, ideas, and efforts; and they support student needs in classrooms, the library, and labs. Every department and every student at the College is touched by gifts to the Annual Fund. 

Portrait

Avery August, PhD ’94
Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology
College of Veterinary Medicine
Targeting asthma in animals and humans
Conducting research on diseases common in humans and animals alike allows Avery August to make discoveries otherwise impossible. Mice, for example, no longer develop asthma when a particular enzyme is targeted. This novel research begs the question: can scientists create new medicines that are similarly effective in humans?
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College News

Cornell scientists have created new vaccines that can prevent metritis and reduce its symptoms, a prospect that could save …
Cornell scientists join collaborators across the country to form a new Canine Longevity Consortium - the first ever …
Dr. Drew Noden was named the recipient of the 2014 Henry Gray/Lippincott Williams Wilkins Scientific Achievement Award by …
The students, faculty, and staff of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine invite you, your family and …
A new five-year, $10 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) enablesscientists across Cornell's …
A new RNA Sequencing Core (RSC) facility opens at the College to help any Cornell researchers interested in studying RNA.
Graduate student Jennifer Puetzer receives award to present a new, more natural way to create meniscus replacements for …
Paul Streeter, assistant dean for finance and administration at the College of Veterinary Medicine, has been named …
Robin Davisson looks back on her time at Cornell, and forward to new opportunities, as she and husband Cornell President …
The American Association of Equine Practitioners is pleased to announce the addition of Lisa Fortier, DVM, Ph.D., DACVS, …
A new multi-state $3 million USDA grant, with scientists participating from five veterinary colleges across the country, …
The results of the first research ever conducted to investigate the association between vitamin D status and congestive …
College thought leaders touch every aspect of the College experience, from the classroom to remote regions of Nepal.
Some of the horses in a a study exploring how summer eczema develops in horses are aging out. Now they're looking for good …
A beloved bunny recovers from uterine cancer after high-stakes surgery.
When it comes to conception there is no middle ground: either you want to get pregnant or you don't.
Scientists document the first proof that raccoon parasite Dracunculus insignis can infect cats.
Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine invites Black Russian Terriers to participate in a genetic study that will …
Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine invites Black Russian Terriers to participate in a genetic study that will …
Scientists seeking to push forward the cancer research frontier have a new springboard from which to launch projects at …
Scientists seeking to push forward the cancer research frontier have a new springboard from which to launch projects at …
Dr. Robin Davisson shares insights in editorial piece "Emerging Concepts in Hypertension" in the journal Antioxidants & …
Dr. Adam Boyko coauthors paper suggesting earliest dogs arose when humans were still hunting and gathering, according to …
Horses face high risks of eye problems, and Cornell clinicians have developed a new way to detect and diagnose them more …
Dr. Alfonso Torres, in collaboration with Dr. Peter Fernandez, from APHIS, is leading the charge to increase the number of …
A new program will give graduate students and post-doctoral scholars at Cornell University new opportunities for exploring …
Dr. Rodney Dietert has won the inaugural Excellence in Teaching Award for undergraduate and graduate teaching.
Dr. Yrjo Grohn has been honored with a lifetime achievement award for his work in veterinary epidemiology and preventive …
The New York State Gaming Commission and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine today announced the …
Dolphin health took a toxic nose dive in one of the areas hit hard by the 2010 BP oil spill, according to a new study.
Cornell researchers launch a study to explore antioxidants' pitfalls and free radicals' silver lining.
Cornell is currently working with the Connecticut Public Health Veterinarian to diagnose several cases of acute …
Dean Michael Kotlikoff presented a joint award to Dr. Robert Weiss, professor, and Bob Riter, from the Cancer Resource …
Dean Michael Kotlikoff, Dr Carolyn McDaniel, and The UltraSound would like to wish you a joyous New Year.
The College will establish Cornell Ruffian Equine Specialists, a referral and emergency care hospital, expected to open in …
The first deep dive into a great white shark's genetic code has fished up big surprises.
Dr. Donald Smith offers suggestions for two books that are sure to captivate veterinarians, practicing and aspiring.
Dr. Robin Davisson, the Andrew Dickson White Professor of Molecular Physiology, was elected fellow of the American …
A collaborative study between Cornell and Smithsonian scientists could transform conservation techniques to preserve Asian …
Cornell faculty have embarked on an innovative study to transform the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of mastitis.
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In the News

Cornell professor Dr. Daniel J. Fletcher, a veterinary specialist in emergency and critical care, taught veterinarians, …
Most little girls want puppies or kittens or maybe rabbits for pets. Tiffany Chu, 36, wanted a goat.
Cornell researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 …
Cornell University has gotten state approval for using sites on Hanshaw Road, Pine Tree Road, in Harford, and on the main …
Dr. Katherine Houpt discusses the relationship between neutering/spaying dogs and behavior.
Dr. Donald Smith discusses the role of women in veterinary medicine.
CUVS recently earned "Best in Urgent Care for Pets" recognition from Serendipity, a magazine that covers Fairfield and …
Listen to Cornell's overview of the annual Westminster Kennel Club dog show!
The College will partner with the New York Animal Agriculture Coalition to present the Dairy Cow Birthing Center exhibit.
Dr. Alfonso Torres, working in collaboration with Dr. Peter Fernandez from APHIS, is leading the charge to increase the …
The New York State Gaming Commission and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine announced the appointment …
Dr. John Hermanson discusses the cost of locomotion in the water in this article.
Dr. Yrjo Grohn, professor of epidemiology at Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine, has been honored with a lifetime …
Dr. Lisa Fortier shared her picks for the top surgery- and lameness-related studies at the American Association of Equine …
Dr. Jarre Jagne discussed the multi-state disease survey of backyard poultry and small commercial flocks at the 150th …
Dr. Don Smith was named a veterinarian to watch by Veterinary Practice News.
Dr. Deborah Pierce shares her experience with the Cornell University Hospital for Animals.
The Baker Institute for Animal Health sponsored the fifth annual blessing of the animals in New York.
Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine has signed a lease-buy agreement with Racebrook Capital Advisors, LLC, …
Cornell researchers have discovered that many of the endangered great white shark's proteins involved in an array of …
Presented by the Washington Art Association and as a benefit for the Baker Institute for Animal Health, this exhibit is …
Cornell's Teaching Dairy Barn is highlighted in Modern Farmer.
Dr. Ed Dubovi explains the disease.
A Cornell alum offers advice in case of an emergency.
Cornell University researchers have recently determined that, in equids at least, it’s the father’s genes that take the …
Cornell offers an approach for laying pets to rest that is increasingly used around the country.
The Cornell Companions pet visitation program has been enhancing life for people around Ithaca for many years. Join them!
Dr. Susan Hackner discusses Cornell University Veterinary Specialists.
Six faculty members and two alumni of Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine have been chosen as inaugural inductees …
Three members of Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine – Donald F. Smith, Kenneth Simpson and Leslie D. Appel – have …
Nemo's story has been featured in hundreds of publications around the world.
Maddies' Shelter Medicine and veterinarians working locally in Niagara county communities are tackling population issues.
Veterinarians will present a seminar on advances in equine health practices and procedures for horse breeders, owners and …
Lessons learned from treating Nemo will have far-reaching benefits for other large animals.
Dr. Adam Boyko discusses the history of dogs in America.
Cornell's new Teaching Dairy Barn is the cover story for Architectural Record.
Dr. Gary Whittaker's research has captured international attention.
Research from Dr. Gary Whittaker's lab has brought scientists closer to understanding why a common virus infecting cats …
Students at the College of Veterinary Medicine recently organized a 3-day, hands-on event for NYS teens aimed at …
Cornell graduate Dr. Isadora Marion '03 shares her love of the profession and how she spends her days.

Contacts

Development

Kevin Mahaney
Assistant Dean, Alumni Affairs, Development, and Communications
S2004 Schurman Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
km70@cornell.edu

 

Communications

Stephanie Specchio
Director, Communications
S2016 Schurman Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
sas6@cornell.edu